20 Aug 2018 | Digital editions, magazines, websites, e-zines, handbooks and contract publishing for the leisure industry

Leisure Opportunities issue 742, 2018 is now out!

Blogs:

Read blogs by writer:

Liz Terry
CEO,
Leisure Media

Kate Cracknell
editor-at-large,
Health Club Management

Tom Walker
Journalist,
Leisure Media

Our guest writers:

Aleatha Ezra
Director of park member development,
World Waterpark Association

Jennifer Fields
Communications Coordinator,
Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Brad Irwin
Partnerships development manager,
Natural History Museum

Michel Buchel
President of Ecsite and CEO of NEMO, Amsetrdan,
NEMO

Julie Becker
Communications and Events Manager,
Ecsite

Eva McDiarmid
Chief Executive,
ASVA

Kurt Janson
Policy Director,
Tourism Alliance

Peter Ducker
Chief executive,
Institute of Hospitality

Maria Zolotonosa
Project Manager,
Ecsite

Ian Taylor
CEO,
SkillsActive

Ufi Ibrahim
Chief Executive,
British Hospitality Association

John Goodbody
Sports Journalist

Sam Coulstock
Customer Relationship Director,
Springboard

Lucy Schweingruber
Fundraising and Events Manager,
Ecsite

View all guest writers

Preservation

08 May 2015
by Liz Terry, CEO, Leisure Media
The technology now exists to enable us to permanently capture the form of the most precious things on earth

It’s been a challenging time for the heritage sector. Widespread destruction of temples and other ancient monuments has been reported in Kathmandu following the Nepal earthquake, along with huge loss of life.

In Syria and Iraq, the devastation has been man made, with the tearing down of antiquities by ISIS. Many agencies and governments are calling for action: UNESCO has suggested the creation of protected zones, the Italian government has called for the UN to intervene and Iraq’s tourism and antiquities minister has asked the US to protect the country’s archaeological sites.

It’s significant that the tourism minister has been the one to make the call, because heritage drives a high proportion of tourism visits and asIraq and other war torn countries work towards rebuilding a peace-time economy, tourism will have an important role to play in the regeneration.

Kathmandu has a huge tourism economy too, so making the city safe and attractive for the return of tourists will be a priority.

In this issue of Attractions Management we look at how technology can help in situations where historic sites are under threat. Our interview with Elizabeth Lee on page 74 examines the CyArk project, which is working tirelessly to digitise precious objects and locations so they can be replicated – either to preserve the original, or to recreate it.

CyArk is a non-profit organisation, founded in 2003, which uses state-of-the-art laser scanning technology to compile highly detailed 3D representations of cultural heritage sites, so they can be recreated using 3D printing and modelling.

The use of replicas is an area of the attractions industry which looks set to grow significantly over the next few decades. There are many reasons for this in addition to natural disaster, war and wilful destruction: perhaps the items in question are in inaccessible locations, or they’re too fragile to handle being exposed to visitors, for example.

In France, the government has invested €56m (US$60m, £40.2m) recreating prehistoric cave paintings at the Grotte Chauvet-Pont d’Arc, a huge collection of paintings of horses,mammoths and rhinos which are among the oldest documented art on earth. The paintings, which are anything up to 37,000 years old, were discovered in 1994.

The project will enable people to experience the incredible cave art while keeping the delicate originals from harm.

Replication also allows more widespread access to cultural heritage when combined with touring rather than static exhibitions. Where a location is fascinating, with a widespread appeal, there will be opportunities to replicate it and take it on the road for guest appearances in museums’ temporary exhibition spaces.

In addition to being priceless in every sense, cultural heritage is of educational significance and a huge driver of tourism. The technology now exists to enable us to permanently capture the form of the most precious things on earth so they can be understood by future generations. We need organisations such as CyArk to step up the pace before more is destroyed.



Tags: Attractions Management  arts & culture  tourism  visitor attractions 

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